7 Ways to Reduce or Eliminate Cannabis Smell

by mountainremedy
this man needs to reduce cannabis smell

1. Open a window

It may sound obvious, but it’s easy to get focused on the task at hand without considering the amount of natural airflow you have in the room. According to the EPA, bringing fresh air into a room is the fastest and more reliable way to dilute any pollutants in the air, which includes cannabis odor. They say:

“Most home heating and cooling systems, including forced air heating systems, do not mechanically bring fresh air into the house. Opening windows and doors, operating window or attic fans, when the weather permits, or running a window air conditioner with the vent control open increases the outdoor ventilation rate.”

If you have to puff indoors, make sure you’ve got maximum fresh air coming in first. It’s a simple trick with the best possible results.

2. Incense

All those hippies in the sixties were on to something. By lighting incense, the strong, natural scents of vanilla, sandalwood, cinnamon, and musk can easily overpower the odors from cannabis. Nag champa is a popular choice since it’s champa flower is delightful while also eliminating the smell of weed and any general smoke smell. Best of all, an incense typically burns itself out when it’s done so, unlike a scented candle, it doesn't need supervision after it’s lit.

3. Alternate modes of consumption

Maybe you have a crotchety neighbor that doesn’t revere the sacred herb the way you do. Bummer. In that case, any amount of dank stank is going to cause you problems. Rather than joints, bowls, bongs, or blunts, which all create plentiful plumes of stinky smoke, consider getting your groove on with another consumption method.

Vaporizers are a more subtle option offering a low-key approach to getting high and there’s no shortage of options, sizes, and price points in this category. Another option: edibles. Although they can be more expensive, choosing a higher dosage and then cutting smaller portions can be an easy way to stretch the stash. It’s more cost-effective, presents a different head experience, and has zero aroma.

4. Air purifier

Technology is amazing, especially when it offers cannabis enthusiasts a plethora of basic air filtration devices. Some high-end brands are so effective, they can “remove 99.9 percent of dust, pollen, smoke, odor, mold spores, and pet dander.” Not only will you get rid of the smoke and smell from weed, but you’ll likely be making the rest of the air in your house healthier too. Win-win!

5. Built-in ventilation

Without realizing it, you may already have a good-quality exhaust system installed in the building where you’re hoping to get your smoke on. This could be a bathroom with a strong fan and a dedicated output tube. Or it could be the fan above the stove. Chefs are notorious for waiting until the last customers leave before blazing up next to their cooking station. Those industrial fans above their ovens are powerful enough to suck up the biggest of exhales in a matter of seconds leaving only the aroma of fryer grease behind. It’s the same principle with many inside fans. Just make sure that you know where the air goes since some cheaper models only appear to push the air outdoors, but actually just move the air around in the same room.

6. Make a Sploof

Now we’re going really old-school. If a fancy air purifier is out of your budget, no worries. But if you MUST smoke inside, and you can’t open a window, you can create your own filtration system using a cardboard tube, a couple of dryer sheets, and a rubber band, with a quick video of assembly, found here . The idea is simple: after you inhale, exhale into the open end of the tube and voilà, your exhale is Downy fresh. It may be rustic, but it gets the job done.

7. Get a carbon filter system

For those situations where it’s imperative not to attract ​any​ attention for “odor of marijuana” – a legal term used by police to allow them to search an area​ –​ it’s wise to consider a carbon filter system. These devices are popular with cannabis growers and use the same principle as an air purifier, with the addition of a serious internal upgrade called a carbon filter or sometimes a carbon scrubber. It’s basically a metal tube-shaped contraption filled with activated carbon granules. The fan attached to the filter sucks the stanky air in, cleans it through the filtration system, then returns clean air. The size you need and how often you change out the granules depends on the size of the room and how often the granules are used. Here’s a video on how to build and install one after you figured out how many fans you really need.